Boilerplate

 

The Center for Microbiome Sciences & Therapeutics (CMiST), part of the UW Medicine’s Department of Medicine and Division of Gastroenterology, is a scientific research center committed to understanding the dynamic interactions between the microbiome and our own human cells, to advancing the development of microbiome-based biotherapeutics to treat or prevent disease and to educating the community about the importance of the microbiome in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. To accomplish these goals, CMiST has established a world class team of clinicians, scientists and educators that span biomedical and basic science departments as well as the arts. 

With access to a brand new germ-free animal facility, Innovations Services devoted to understanding host-microbial and microbial-microbial interactions, and an environment that promotes scientific rigor, fosters creativity, believes in the value of arts in science and celebrates out-of-the-box thinking, CMiST will be a beacon for translational microbiome research.  For additional information about CMiST and the Innovation Services we offer, visit our website at www.cmistuw.org or email us at info@cmistuw.org. If you would like to learn more about our director, William DePaolo, or are interested in a scientific or artistic collaboration, please email info@depaololab.com or visit our laboratory website at www.depaololab.com

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Leadership

 

R. William DePaolo

 


Associate Professor | Medicine
Lynn M. & Michael D. Garvey Endowed Chair | Gastroenterology
Director | Center for Microbiome Sciences & Therapeutics (CMiST)

 

Biography

Dr. William DePaolo, Will, is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington Medical Center and is the recipient of the Lynn M. and Michael D. Garvey endowed chair in Gastroenterology.

Will was named Director of the Center for Microbiome Sciences & Therapeutics (CMiST). CMiST will serve as a beacon for investigators, clinicians and patients interested in the human microbiome, and will offer a number of Innovation Services, facilitate collaboration and exploration through workshops and seminar series, and work alongside clinicians to develop and test microbiome-derived therapeutics.

In 2004, Will received his PhD in Immunology & Microbial Pathogenesis from the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University. Will then completed his postdoctoral training at the University of Chicago where he investigated the molecular pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, while concurrently developing projects investigating immune-modulation within the intestine. In 2011, Will joined the faculty at University of Southern California as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology. Will combines his interdisciplinary training to investigate the contribution of our 100 trillion gut bacteria (or microbiome) to inflammatory diseases and to develop strategies aimed at manipulating this vast community. Will's current research extends across scientific disciplines and clinical diseases such as obesity, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and enteric pathogens.

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Full Curriculum vitae

Lab website

 
 

Buzz

 

Articles

The UW Whole U Faculty Friday / here

Poop Art! Or, bringing science to the masses / UW Medicine, The Huddle, here

What your poop says about your health / UW Medicine, Right as Rain, here

 

Videos

Produced by UW Medicine

 

 

All those kisses and nose snuffles have more of an effect on a pet owner's physiology than you might expect. William DePaolo, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, notes in his research that we share up to 50 percent of our gut biome with our dogs.

 

At the UW Medicine's Center for Microbiome Sciences & Therapeutics, researcher Will DePaolo's team investigates the interplay of diet and gut bacteria, and how that interplay affects your health.

 
 

Research Overview

 
 

Art and Science initiative: Vivo Art

Art and science is not a new concept. In fact, there is a growing field of art called bio- or sci-art where art works are created using scientific and biological processes. Such collaborations, while inspiring and positive, are not often formed with the specific intent to answer a scientific question. Bio / sci-art relationships tend to ask dynamic and existential questions: ‘what constitutes life’, ‘what is a human being,’ ‘who are we?’  While interesting, these projects do not often include research for the sake of science. Vivo Art, our art and science initiative, attempts to use art to advance science.

 
 
 

Center overview

 

Inaugural year in review

 

Logos & Photos

 
 
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Will and Margaret Heitkemper, RN, PhD, FAAN discuss possible collaborations to study irritable bowel syndrome summer 2017

Will and Margaret Heitkemper, RN, PhD, FAAN discuss possible collaborations to study irritable bowel syndrome
summer 2017

Will and DePaolo Lab graduate student, Melissa Kordahi Winter 2018

Will and DePaolo Lab graduate student, Melissa Kordahi
Winter 2018

 
 
Will and CMiST artist-in-residence, Kathy High, joint talk for UW School of Art + Art History + Design Summer 2017

Will and CMiST artist-in-residence, Kathy High, joint talk for UW School of Art + Art History + Design
Summer 2017

Will giving talk on fad diets and gut microbiome for The Whole U June 2017

Will giving talk on fad diets and gut microbiome for The Whole U
June 2017